Tag Archives: IaaS

All Things Considered About Cloud Computing Risks and Challenges

Last month during the RSA show, I met with Rob Westervelt from ITKnowledgeExchange in the Starbucks across from Moscone Center. Rob recorded our discussion about the challenges of security in the cloud and turned this into a podcast. I’m quite pleased with the results. You can pick up a little Miles Davis in the background, the odd note of an espresso being drawn. Alison thinks that I sound very NPR. Having been raised on CBC Radio, I take this as a great compliment.

Pour yourself a coffee and have a listen.

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Economist: Unlocking the Cloud

The Economist is now reporting on the cloud. They’ve picked up on the very real concern of vendor lock-in because of proprietary standards. The article focuses on data portability between SaaS apps, but the same issue arises in IaaS (different proprietary virtualization formats, despite what the Open Virtualization Format (OVF) promises), and in PaaS (google app engine extensions to Python which are hard to ignore and lock you into their platform).

NIST Perspective on Cloud Computing

Earlier this month, NIST went public with their perspective on cloud computing. This is important because NIST is a well-respected, public standards organization, and there is still a lot of confusion about what cloud really is (the *-aaS affect).

They released only  a short, two page document and a longer, 72 slide PowerPoint (you can find their main page here). They are offering a broad definition based on essential characteristics, delivery models, and deployment models:

Essential Characteristics:

On-demand self-service

Ubiquitous network access

Location independent resource pooling

Rapid elasticity

Measured Service

Delivery Models:

Cloud Software as a Service (SaaS)

Cloud Platform as a Service (PaaS)

Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

Deployment Models:

Private cloud

Community cloud

Public cloud

Hybrid cloud

There’s not really anything new here, but that’s fine; it’s more important as a validation of the emerging models and ideas from a public standards body. I do like the three pronged approach, acknowleding that cloud is a lot of things but at the same time keeping it simple and concise. Brevity is the soul of great standards.

It’s worth keeping an eye on this effort.