Monthly Archives: April 2012

The Well-Designed API

We have worked with many APIs here at Layer 7. And over time we’ve seen it all, ranging from the good to the bad. We even see the downright ugly. Now a good API is a beautiful thing; it encourages innovation, abstracts appropriately, and is designed with enough forethought that nobody needs to change it down the road. Resiliency is a good quality in an API. APIs are a little like cockroaches in that they will likely outlive the human race.

But what about the other ones? The ugly and bad ones? This is where developers could use some guidance.

Truth is, good API design isn’t really hard, but it’s not easy. One thing I point people to is Leonard Richardson’s Maturity Model for REST, which Martin Fowler explores in his blog. Now I’m not a REST purist by any means—truth is I’m as guilty of quick-and-dirty HTTP tunneling hacks as the next guy—but when you see the maturity phases laid out so succinctly, you can’t help but be inspired to move toward more “resourceful” thinking and maybe even learn to love HATEOS. Part of good API design is knowing what you should aspire to, and Richardson’s model is much more concise and accessible than Fielding’s thesis.

Another good source of advice is Joshua Bloch’s superb Google Tech Talk How to Design A Good API and Why it Matters. Bloch wrote what is arguably the most important book about Java ever written, and indeed his talk is about APIs using Java as the model. But don’t let that deter you; virtually everything Bloch discusses is as relevant to RESTful JSON-style APIs as it is to Java. Follow his advice, transpose it to you language of choice, and frame it with an understanding of where you want to land in the maturity model for REST, and you will end the day with great APIs.

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Developers, Developers, Developers – Why API Management Should be Important To You Featuring RedMonk

It’s about developers again.

Everything in technology goes through cycles. If you stick around long enough, you begin to see patterns emerge with an almost predictable regularity. I actually find this comforting; it suggests we’re on a path of refinement of fundamental truths that date back in a continuous line though Alan Kay to Turing and beyond.

The wrong way to react to technology cycles is with the defensive-and-crusty “this is nothing new kid—we did it back in ’99 when you were stuck in the womb.” Thanks for nothing, Grandpa. A better approach is to recognize the importance of new energy and momentum to make great things happen.

The cycle that really excites me now is the new rise of the developer. Trying my best not to be crusty, there is a palatable excitement and energy out there that really does feel like it did in 1999. After years of outsourcing, after years of commoditization, developers matter again. A lot. It’s like the world has rediscovered the critical importance of this fundamentally creative endeavor.

This is a golden age of technology and possibility, one that is being driven by new blood and newer technology. The catalyst is the achingly perfect collision of cloud, mobility and social discovery with APIs, node.js, Git, NoSQL, HTML5, massive scalability… (I really could go on and on here).

Most of all, I’m excited by movements like Codecademy. This simple idea perfectly reflects the tenor of the time in which we live. People are no longer afraid of making things easy. The priesthood is gone; coding is now confident and mature.

I’ll be talking more about these topics and the important role APIs play in an upcoming webinar I will be delivering with James Governor, co-founder of Redmonk. This is the analyst firm that truly is at the heart of the new developer movement. I hope you can join us Thursday, April 19 at 9am Pacific. This one is going to be good.