Tag Archives: CSA

The Cloud Security Alliance Introduces The Security, Trust and Assurance Registry

As a vendor of security products, I see a lot of Requests for Proposal (RFPs). More often than not these consist of an Excel spreadsheet with dozens—sometimes even hundreds—of questions ranging from how our products address business concerns to security minutia that only a high-geek can understand. RFPs are a lot of work for any vendor to respond to, but they are an important part of the selling process and we always take them seriously. RFPs are also a tremendous amount of work for the customer to prepare, so it’s not surprising that they vary greatly in sophistication.

I’ve always thought it would be nice if the SOA gateway space had a standardized set of basic questions that focused vendors and customers on the things that matter most in Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC). In the cloud space, such a framework now exists. The Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) has introduced the Security, Trust and Assurance Registry (STAR), which is a series of questions designed to document the security controls a cloud provider has in place. IaaS, PaaS and SaaS cloud providers will self-assess their status and publish the results in the CSA’s centralized registry.

Providers report on their compliance with CSA best practices in two different ways. From the CSA STAR announcement:

1. The Consensus Assessments Initiative Questionnaire (CAIQ), which provides industry-accepted ways to document what security controls exist in IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS offerings. The questionnaire (CAIQ) provides a set of over 140 questions a cloud consumer and cloud auditor may wish to ask of a cloud provider. Providers may opt to submit a completed Consensus Assessments Initiative Questionnaire.
2. The Cloud Controls Matrix (CCM), which provides a controls framework that gives detailed understanding of security concepts and principles that are aligned to the Cloud Security Alliance guidance in 13 domains. As a framework, the CSA CCM provides organizations with the needed structure, detail and clarity relating to information security tailored to the cloud industry. Providers may choose to submit a report documenting compliance with Cloud Controls Matrix.

The spreadsheets cover eleven control areas, each subdivided into a number of distinct control specifications. The control areas are:

  1. Compliance
  2. Data Governance
  3. Facility Security
  4. Human Resources
  5. Information Security
  6. Legal
  7. Operations Management
  8. Risk Management
  9. Release Management
  10. Resiliency
  11. Security Architecture

The CSA hopes that STAR will help to shorten purchasing cycles for cloud services because the assessment addresses many of the security concerns that users have today with the cloud. As with any benchmark, over time vendors will refine their product to do well against the test—and as with many benchmarks, this may be to the detriment of other important indicators. But this set of controls has been well thought through by the security professionals in the CSA community, so cramming for this test will be a positive step for security in the cloud.

Layer 7 Technologies Joins the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA)

I’m pleased to announce that Layer 7 has joined the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) as a full corporate member. For the past several years, the CSA has assumed the leadership role in defining the best practices to secure cloud applications, data, and infrastructure.

I believe that when you join a community organization, you are obliged to make a real contribution. Being a member means a lot more than just having your company logo on the sponsor list. I’ve been involved previously with the CSA, as a co-author of version 2 of its Security Guidance for Critical Areas of Focus in Cloud Computing, and as a co-author of the organization’s Top Threats in Cloud Computing document. Now that we are corporate members, Layer 7 will help to drive two important events within the CSA.

First, Layer 7 is a sponsor the CSA summit at this year’s RSA conference in San Francisco, running Feb 14-18, 2011. I was a participant at the CSA summit last year. This one-day event sold out instantly, and most attendees agree it was one of the highlights of the RSA conference. If you are in San Francisco for the 2011 RSA show, you should try to get into Monday’s CSA event. The CSA has some very special guests lined up to speak—including Vivek Kundra, US Chief CIO—and I can assure you that once again the summit will be the talk of the RSA.

I am also fortunate to be co-presenting a CSA-sponsored webinar about Managing API Security in SaaS and Cloud with Liam Lynch, eBay’s Head of Security. The rapidly growing API management space has a number of unique challenges with segmentation of roles, access to usage information, developer on-boarding, user management, and community building. Liam and I will talk about our own experiences in this space, and I will explore several case studies that illustrate each issue and its solution. I hope you can join us on Feb 23, 2011 for this talk.

Cloud Security Alliance Guidance v2 Released

Last week, the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) released its Security Guidance for Critical Areas of Focus in Cloud Computing V2.1. This is a follow-on to first guidance document released only last April, which, gives you a sense of the speed at which cloud technology and techniques are moving. I was one of the contributors to this project.

The guidance explores the issues in cloud security from the perspective of 13 different domains:

Cloud Architecture

  • Domain 1: Cloud Computing Architectural Framework

Governing in the Cloud

  • Domain 2: Governance and Enterprise Risk Management
  • Domain 3: Legal and Electronic Discovery
  • Domain 4: Compliance and Audit
  • Domain 5: Information Lifecycle Management
  • Domain 6: Portability and Interoperability

Operating in the Cloud

  • Domain 7: Traditional Security, Business Continuity, and Disaster Recovery
  • Domain 8: Data Center Operations
  • Domain 9: Incident Response, Notification, and Remediation
  • Domain 10: Application Security
  • Domain 11: Encryption and Key Management
  • Domain 12: Identity and Access Management
  • Domain 13: Virtualization

I thought the domain classification was quite good because it serves to remind people that technology is only a small part of a cloud security strategy. I know that’s become a terrible security cliche, but there’s a difference between saying this and understanding what it really means. The CSA domain structure–even without the benefits of the guidance–at least serves as a concrete reminder of what’s behind the slogan.

Have a close look at the guidance.  Read it; think about it; disagree with it; change it–but in the end, make it your own. Then share your experiences with the community. The guidance is an evolving document that is a product of a collective, volunteer effort. It’s less political than a conventional standards effort (look though the contributors and you will find individuals, not companies). The group can move fast, and it doesn’t need to be proscriptive like a standard–it’s more a distillation of considerations and best practices. This one is worth tracking.